Completion and implementation of Simacan Control Tower

Martijn Loot (1983) is responsible for the delivery and implementation of our products and applications. He moves between the client’s perspective and the programmer’s room for manoeuvre. He understands the language of carriers and the codes of developers. “I navigate between end product and development, between traffic science and data, and between content and application.

“During my Civil Engineering studies I became more and more interested in traffic. The combination of data, its analysis and studying traffic and traffic data came during my work. What is the effect of increasing the speed to 130 km? I found out that many traffic cases are based on psychology. If you add good measurement data to traffic issues, then you can separate it from sentiment and make really good models and scenarios.

Data, traffic science and software came together when I met Rob at Rijkswaterstaat. I wanted to work with him. Building applications and products from scratch is fun to do in a team. Each person from his or her specific discipline and perspective. I want to keep my focus: on the developers and the customer. Where are the gaps? Where are the extra opportunities? New opportunities? My role as a critical nitpicker from the customer’s perspective, from the user’s perspective, from that of programmer and developer, and also from the end user’s perspective, such as driver or customer at home, makes our specific work more widely deployable. Not only relevant for our customers, but also for their customers.

An example of this is Albert Heijn Online. We were already working on the Simacan Control Tower. There was a need for a time block, but how could it be made working properly? If such an idea arises, I’m going to arouse interest; with our client, with our people. Because the best thing is to develop and apply products together. The best thing is when others can use them as well. Even better: when different customers reinforce each other. When logistics and traffic complement each other, when ANWB‘s data is enriched by that of the Directorate-General for Public Works and Water Management and TomTom. And when that is cleverly linked to that of transporters. In short: where data, traffic science and software come together, I want to find opportunities to improve and broaden our products, knowledge and potential”.

[Text by: Jeroen van den Nieuwenhuizen]